MS Awareness: What You Need to Know about MS Symptoms

Many of you know that I was diagnosed with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) in 2016. However, I’d struggled with demylenating brain lesions since 1999–nearly 15 years.

One of the greatest frustrations with MS is how hard it can be to diagnose it correctly. It often mimics other diseases, and people can become frustrated with a series of well-intended but wrong diagnoses (lupus, stroke, inner ear problems, other neurological diseases, Lyme disease, etc.).

The following videos are helpful in identifying common and lesser known symptoms of MS.

What to Do If You Think You or Someone You Love May Have MS

If you or someone you love is experiencing symptoms of MS, see a doctor who can assess your symptoms and recommend a neurologist if he or she believes you need further evaluation. If symptoms persist, bring it to the doctor’s attention again.

It’s important to understand that it may take time and numerous tests to get a clear diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Doctors often use a tem called clinically isolated syndrome when someone has an experience or doctors discover a finding that indicates multiple sclerosis but does not yet meet diagnostic criteria. Doctors may also use the term possible multiple sclerosis.

Track any symptoms you may be having. Be sure to include dates. Keep a journal of the onset of any new symptoms that may have a neurological cause. With MS, everyone is different, but early MS symptoms included dizziness, vomiting, hearing problems, vision problems, a facial droop, and difficulty walking. I also had neuropathic pain in my legs and feet. The first doctors who saw me thought I had inner ear problems and Bell’s palsy or had had a slight stroke. Also, keep a record of test results.

Take someone with you to important appointments for support. Important appointments may be different for you than for me. Any appointment when I thought my doctor might confirm a diagnosis was an important appointment for me. I couldn’t trust myself to absorb information clearly and objectively. People respond to crucial information differently. It’s helpful to have someone else listening if we need a moment to absorb the idea of medication or injections or a change in diet or lifestyle.

Share your MS story with us. We love to hear from you.

For more information and support, visit the National MS Society.

 

What Is MS: Multiple Sclerosis Awareness

Photo Credit: Pixabay

 

Many of you know that I was recently diagnosed with the relapsing-remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS). My diagnosis came after a life-threatening appearance of a demylenating lesion in my brain stem (specifically the pons region of my brain stem) in 1999. This was followed by more than ten years where I experienced a number of bizarre, seemingly unrelated symptoms.

Although I visited a number of neurologists and other physicians, all but one seemed to find my symptoms unrelated. Several times I was told unequivocally by neurologists that I did NOT have MS. Over those years, my husband and I moved several times, and I couldn’t any establish continuity with any doctor long enough to make sense of my history of dizziness, falling down, headaches, choking, foot cramps, finger tremors, hearing loss, nausea, and a changing gait.

Then in late 2014, I developed additional neurological symptoms and was ordered to undergo a brain biopsy of a new large lesion that had appeared in and around the area of my brain stem. The neurosurgeon was confident it was a glioma, considered to be an early form of cancer. The biopsy required a crainiotomy and resection (p. 8) , which was an additional challenge to my neurological system.

Why MS is Often Misdiagnosed
My situation is not unique. Many disorders share symptoms with MS, making diagnosis difficult. Those disorders include

Lupus: can cause muscle pain, joint swelling, fatigue, butterfly-shaped rash across the cheeks, and headaches
Lyme disease: fatigue, fever, headaches, and muscle and joint aches
Stroke: loss of vision; loss of feeling in the limbs, usually on one side of the body; difficulty walking; and difficulty speaking
Migraine: intense pain; throbbing; sensitivity to light, sounds, or smells; nausea and vomiting; blurred vision; and lightheadedness and fainting
Fibromyalgia: headaches, joint and muscle pain, numbness and tingling of extremities, memory problems, and fatigue
Conversion and psychogenic disorders: conditions in which psychological stress is converted into a physical problem — such as blindness or paralysis — for which no medical cause can be found
Sjogren’s disorder: dry eyes, dry mouth, fatigue, and musculoskeletal pain
Vasculitis: joint pain, blurred vision, and numbness, tingling, and weakness in the limbs
Myasthenia gravis: drooping eyelids, double vision, difficulty with walking, speaking, chewing, and swallowing
Sarcoidosis: including fatigue and decreased vision
Vitamin B-12 deficiency: fatigue, mental confusion, and numbness and tingling in the hands and feet
Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM): fever, fatigue, headache, nausea, vomiting, vision loss, and difficulty walking
The National MS Society has created the following short video. It gives a simple explanation of what happens in a person’s body when they live with MS and helps us understand why the disease can be so difficult to diagnose, since MS influences every function of the brain, and therefore, the body.

The video helped me understand that because one of my largest lesions damaged the pons area of my brain, it makes sense that my breathing, swallowing, taste, sleeping, vision, hearing, balance, and walking have changed.

WHAT IS MS?