No More Tug-of-War: How to Get Dementia Sufferers to Cooperate

 

It was difficult to watch my mom progress through the various stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Sometimes she was quiet and sedate, and at others she was combative and uncooperative. It didn’t take me long to discover that certain actions, environments, and responses triggered Mom’s agitation. For instance, keeping my voice calm and my expression smiling, even when I felt tense, helped prevent Mom’s anxiety from escalating.

Dementia patients can seem stubborn, obstinate, or lazy. They may appear mean and ornery or like they don’t want to participate in life. But those actions require choice—choices those with dementia struggle to make.

Behavioral changes occur in those with dementia
because the disease process causes brain damage.

People with dementia can’t process information (seeing, hearing, speaking) quickly or the same way they did when they were younger and healthy. They have a desire to express themselves and be engaged, as all humans do. They retain the desire to be productive and relate meaningfully far longer than they have the ability.

It’s important to keep people with dementia engaged and active. There are many reasons to keep loved ones with dementia participating in activities:

  • It gives caregivers a break
  • It can decrease agitation and fear
  • It can decrease wandering, rummaging, and asking repetitive questions
  • It helps those with dementia feel productive

The brain damage from dementia can make it difficult for people

  • to initiate activity.
  • to understand directions.
  • to make choices.

This is because it can take people with dementia up to 60 seconds to process information. This fact is important to remember when gauging simple speech with a loved one living with dementia.

While we can’t changed out loved one’s diagnosis, we can alter the way we relate to them.

Changing how we approach an elder with
dementia can improve their quality of life.

Consider some of the following steps to help make your loved one’s life easier:

  1. Think of the easiest way to explain directions or a process. Break it down into individual steps.
  2. If someone is being uncooperative, try to think from their perspective about what the problem might be.
  3. When possible, modify activities to be easier.
  4. Don’t ask when you can tell. For instance, don’t say, “Do you remember who I am, Dad?” Instead, say, “Hi, Dad. It’s me, Sharon.”
  5. Be sensitive to your tone and facial expression. It’s more important HOW you say something than what you are saying.
  6. If a word upsets them, don’t use it. My mother hated the shower, so I would say, “Come with me, Mom, I need some help,” which I needed. I needed her cooperation.
  7. If someone is frightened, don’t tell them not to be, which doesn’t help. Acknowledge their fear and tell them you will keep them safe and protect them.
  8. DON’T argue and defer to logic. Acknowledge what concerns them (“I know you miss your mother.”) and try to redirect them Let’s wait for her over here. Can you help me fold towels while we wait?”).
  9. People with dementia often respond to the question “Can you help me?”.
  10. Find or create tasks that your elder can help with: sorting laundry, folding towels, vacuuming, dusting, straightening the pantry, setting the table, etc.When possible, have your loved one do tasks with If you’re cooking, as them to chop the eggs (maybe not with a knife) mix the salad ingredients, or snap the green beans.
  11. Give instructions only one step or two at a time.
  12. Set out any items that are needed for a task.
  13. If you are asking your elder to do something, do it with them to demonstrate.
  14. Get them games, puzzles, cards, books, etc. with enlarged and simplified print and visuals. People with dementia seem to be particularly fascinated with children—books with children’s faces, TV shows featuring children, etc.

Recommended activities:

  • sorting silverware
  • dusting
  • looking through photographs
  • coloring
  • walking
  • petting a dog or cat
  • listening to music yard
  • work sorting coins or nuts and bolts
  • washing windows
  • gardening

What have you found helpful? Share it with us here.

 

 

3 thoughts on “No More Tug-of-War: How to Get Dementia Sufferers to Cooperate

  1. My 89 Year old Father has Dementia and his wife who isn’t my mother placed him in a nursing home and made her daughter power of attorney over my Dad and I have no access to his medical records and can’t get any information from the nursing home.

    • First of all, let me say how very sorry I am for the heartbreak of your circumstances. This must be very, very hard for you, Linda. You are in my prayers.

      I would consult an elder care attorney in your state and see what your options are. Laws vary from state to state. But try to keep communication open with your dad’s wife and daughter, if they will allow it. If you are able to visit him, consider going to see him and having him sign HIPPA forms that give you access to his medical information or have someone else ask him to sign the forms.

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